Global minimum Corporation Tax of 15%

A new consultation has been published by the UK government seeking views for how a worldwide 15% minimum Corporation Tax should be enforced domestically. This follows more than 130 countries signing up to a new global minimum tax framework in October 2021, after the G7 agreed in principle to this measure during UK’s presidency.

We have also seen publication of the Global Anti-Base Erosion Model Rules (Pillar Two) by the OECD/ G20 on 20 December 2021. This paper states that implementation of these new rules is envisaged by 2023.

This new agreement is expected to ensure large international firms pay at least 15% tax rate on profits in each country in which they operate, helping to tackle avoidance and ensure a more level playing field for UK businesses.

The consultation will run for 12 weeks and seeks views on the application of the global minimum Corporation Tax in the UK, as well as a series of wider implementation matters, including who the rules apply to, transition rules and how firms within scope should report and pay.

Source: HM Government Tue, 18 Jan 2022 00:00:00 +0100

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