VAT – what is partial exemption?

A business that incurs expenditure on taxable and exempt business activities is partially exempt for VAT purposes. This can happen where a business makes or intends to make both taxable and exempt supplies and incurs input tax that relates to both kinds of supply. Under this scenario, the business must make an apportionment between the activities using a 'partial exemption method' to calculate how much input tax is recoverable.

There are a number of partial exemption methods available. The standard method of recovering any remaining input tax is to apply the ratio of the value of taxable supplies to total supplies, subject to the exclusion of certain items which could distort the calculations. The standard method is automatically overridden where it produces a result that differs substantially from one based on the actual use of inputs. It is possible to agree a special method with HMRC.

The VAT incurred on exempt supplies can be recovered subject to two parallel de-minimis limits.

The tests are met where the total value of exempt input tax:

  1. Is under £625 a month (£1,875 a quarter/£7,500 a year); and
  2. Is less than half of the total input tax incurred.

If both tests are met the VAT can be recovered. Businesses that are partially exempt, need to complete this calculation on a quarterly basis as well as completing an annual calculation.

Source: HM Revenue & Customs Wed, 23 Jun 2021 00:00:00 +0100

Latest articles

Notifying cessation of self-employment

Any taxpayers that have ceased to be self-employed must notify HMRC of their change in status. There are a number of steps that must be followed if a taxpayer ceases trading as a sole trader or if they are ending or leaving a business

Submitting CIS nil monthly returns

The Construction Industry Scheme (CIS) is a set of special rules for tax and National Insurance for those working in the construction industry. Businesses in the construction industry are known as ‘contractors’ and ‘subcontractors’ and should be

Check employment status for tax

The Check Employment Status for Tax (CEST) tool can be used to help ascertain if a worker should be classified as employed or self-employed for tax purposes in both the private and public sector.

The service provides HMRC’s view if IR35 legislation

Class 1A payment deadline

Class 1A NICs are paid by employers in respect of most benefits in kind provided to employees such as a company car. There is no employee contribution payable. If you provided taxable benefits to staff or directors your business is likely to have a