Why compound interest is important

Many of us are building a pension fund, a portfolio of shares or deposits with our bank or building society.

Most of these investment options reward us for our participation by offering income (usually in the form of interest or dividends) or by demonstrating capital growth (share prices increasing).

Accordingly, there are three components to our investments: the capital sum we invest, any growth in the value of the capital sum invested or rewards (interest or dividends) paid by banks or companies in which we hold shares.

What we do with these rewards, particularly interest and dividends, is key to the speed with which our investments grow.

The reason for this is the impact of compound interest.

If the average return on your investments is say 3%, paid as dividends or interest, if you withdraw these payments your investments will maintain their capital value and over time inflation may reduce the purchasing power of this capital value as the value of money decreases.

Whereas, if you reinvest rewards, future returns will compound, and you are more likely to counter the effects of inflation.

Over short term periods these effects are small, but over longer periods the impact of compounding can be dramatic.

Source: Other Wed, 25 Nov 2020 00:00:00 +0100

Latest articles

Notifying cessation of self-employment

Any taxpayers that have ceased to be self-employed must notify HMRC of their change in status. There are a number of steps that must be followed if a taxpayer ceases trading as a sole trader or if they are ending or leaving a business

Submitting CIS nil monthly returns

The Construction Industry Scheme (CIS) is a set of special rules for tax and National Insurance for those working in the construction industry. Businesses in the construction industry are known as ‘contractors’ and ‘subcontractors’ and should be

Check employment status for tax

The Check Employment Status for Tax (CEST) tool can be used to help ascertain if a worker should be classified as employed or self-employed for tax purposes in both the private and public sector.

The service provides HMRC’s view if IR35 legislation

Class 1A payment deadline

Class 1A NICs are paid by employers in respect of most benefits in kind provided to employees such as a company car. There is no employee contribution payable. If you provided taxable benefits to staff or directors your business is likely to have a